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Flip Flop Using Electron Beam Activated FET's

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092118D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cheroff, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A noncomplementary insulated-gate field effect transistor circuit is electron-beam activated so as to achieve a flip-flop function. Enhancement-type, n-channel insulated-gate field effect transistors 1 and 3 are connected in series between voltage source V and ground. Gate electrodes 5 and 7 are connected to opposite sides of pulse generator PG and biased selectively with opposite polarity signals of sufficient magnitude so as to turn one transistor on and the other transistor off. When electrodes 5 and 7 are biased and irradiated by an electron beam, as indicated by the arrows, a steady-state charge distribution is established within gate insulators 9 and 11, respectively, the polarity of such change distribution being determined by the polarity of the gate bias.

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Flip Flop Using Electron Beam Activated FET's

A noncomplementary insulated-gate field effect transistor circuit is electron- beam activated so as to achieve a flip-flop function. Enhancement-type, n- channel insulated-gate field effect transistors 1 and 3 are connected in series between voltage source V and ground. Gate electrodes 5 and 7 are connected to opposite sides of pulse generator PG and biased selectively with opposite polarity signals of sufficient magnitude so as to turn one transistor on and the other transistor off. When electrodes 5 and 7 are biased and irradiated by an electron beam, as indicated by the arrows, a steady-state charge distribution is established within gate insulators 9 and 11, respectively, the polarity of such change distribution being determined by the polarity of the gate bias. For example, when electrodes 5 and 7 are biased positively and negatively, respectively, during electron beam irradiation, transistors 1 and 3 are rendered conductive and nonconductive, respectively, after irradiation and a positive potential, i.e., 1, appears at output terminal 13. Conversely, when gate electrodes 5 and 7 are biased negatively and positively, respectively, during electron beam irradiation, transistors 1 and 3 are rendered nonconductive and conductive, respectively, so that the potential at output terminal 13 is essentially ground, i.e.,
0. Since one of transistors 1 or 3 is off in both the 1 and 0 states, nearly zero stand-by power consum...