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Low Restriction Magnetic Flow Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092184D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baker, VO: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A negligible resistance flow detector is provided which gives an electrical output indicative of the flow. Vane 12 is located within pipe 14 through which fluid 15 flows. Vane 12 is attached to rotatable shaft 16 which extends through the diameter of pipe 14. Magnet 18 is attached to the end of shaft 16 which extends outside of pipe 14. Magnet 18 extends parallel to the plane of vane 12. Reed switch 20 is provided adjacent magnet 18. Switch 20 is separated from magnet 18 by a thin nonmagnetic partition 22 which keeps fluid 15 contained. Shaft 16 is constrained by spring 24 so that the quiescent position of shaft 16 locates vane 12 crosswise to the direction of flow within pipe 14.

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Low Restriction Magnetic Flow Detector

A negligible resistance flow detector is provided which gives an electrical output indicative of the flow. Vane 12 is located within pipe 14 through which fluid 15 flows. Vane 12 is attached to rotatable shaft 16 which extends through the diameter of pipe 14. Magnet 18 is attached to the end of shaft 16 which extends outside of pipe 14. Magnet 18 extends parallel to the plane of vane 12. Reed switch 20 is provided adjacent magnet 18. Switch 20 is separated from magnet 18 by a thin nonmagnetic partition 22 which keeps fluid 15 contained. Shaft 16 is constrained by spring 24 so that the quiescent position of shaft 16 locates vane 12 crosswise to the direction of flow within pipe 14.

In this quiescent position, magnet 18 extends crosswise to the long dimension of reed switch 20 so that the contacts of such switch are open and no electrical circuit is completed. The flow of fluid 15 in pipe 14 causes vane 12 to turn parallel to the direction of the flow against the spring tension of shaft 16. This causes the magnet 18 to align itself parallel with the long dimension of reed switch 20 thus closing the contacts and completing the circuit indicating that flaw is taking place. As soon as the flow stops, shaft spring 24 returns magnet 18 and vane 12 to the rest position perpendicular to the direction of flow.

The vane 12 shape is dictated by the force necessary to provide a positive rotating action and still insure good stability in...