Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Interconnecting Circuit Pins

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092199D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kresge, JD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Interconnecting pins for multilayer circuit cards can be fabricated using chemical etching methods that are effective only against selected metals or dielectrics to be removed at a particular time in the process. As at A, substrate 1 is covered with mechanical mask 2 provided with openings 3. The latter are the size of the intended pins. In B, a first metal 4, such as copper, and a second metal 5, such as chromium, are successively evaporated on both substrate 1 and mask 2. Metal 4 forms the interconnecting pin. Metal 5 serves as a temporary protective coating for the copper. The next step shown at C indicates the removal of mask 2. A thick film of dielectric such as silicon dioxide 6 is then sputtered on the substrate to produce the assembly at D.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Interconnecting Circuit Pins

Interconnecting pins for multilayer circuit cards can be fabricated using chemical etching methods that are effective only against selected metals or dielectrics to be removed at a particular time in the process. As at A, substrate 1 is covered with mechanical mask 2 provided with openings 3. The latter are the size of the intended pins. In B, a first metal 4, such as copper, and a second metal 5, such as chromium, are successively evaporated on both substrate 1 and mask 2. Metal 4 forms the interconnecting pin. Metal 5 serves as a temporary protective coating for the copper. The next step shown at C indicates the removal of mask 2. A thick film of dielectric such as silicon dioxide 6 is then sputtered on the substrate to produce the assembly at D. A short, buffered hydrofluoric acid etch, applied to the assembly, removes enough of the dielectric to expose the edges of metal 5 applied as at E. Subsequent etching of metal 5 results in that metal and the dielectric fastened to it being completely removed, leaving only pins 4 and the dielectric attached to the substrate.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]