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Zero Dominate Binary Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092205D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eichelberger, EB: AUTHOR

Abstract

In certain types of implementations of digital circuits and storage, the energy required to store or transmit a 1 bit is significantly greater than that required to store or transmit a 0 bit. The following code significantly reduces the number of 1 bits. The code can be effectively utilized are optical stores, holographic stores, and monolithic storage. To implement, for example, a 4-bit binary code, it is only necessary to supply an additional Z bit per word of the code as below. (Image Omitted)

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Zero Dominate Binary Code

In certain types of implementations of digital circuits and storage, the energy required to store or transmit a 1 bit is significantly greater than that required to store or transmit a 0 bit. The following code significantly reduces the number of 1 bits. The code can be effectively utilized are optical stores, holographic stores, and monolithic storage. To implement, for example, a 4-bit binary code, it is only necessary to supply an additional Z bit per word of the code as below.

(Image Omitted)

The following rules apply to encoding procedures to convert the 4-bit binary code to a Z code. If the number of 1 bits is equal to or less than N/2, set Z=0 and leave the binary variable unchanged. If the number of 1 bits is greater than N/2, set Z=1 and complement the binary variables. To decode the Z code to the binary code, the following rules apply. If Z=0, leave the binary variables unchanged.

If Z=1, complement the binary variables. The dual of the above rules is equally as effective, i.e., achieves an encoding that decodes by complementing if Z=O and not complementing if Z=1.

The Z code is efficient. For example, with n even, there are exactly 2/n/ code words of n+1 bits that have no more than n/2 1 bits. The required number of bits increases significantly if the number of 1 bits is decreased much below n/2. Thus the Z-code is the optimum choice for code to reduce the number of 1 bits.

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