Browse Prior Art Database

Gaseous Transparent Electrode Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092283D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dreyfus, RW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In certain optical studies, particularly where frequencies in the infrared and far infrared are employed, it is desirable to use transparent electrodes. Known transparent electrodes, such as those composed of metallic thin films and ionic solutions, are not sufficiently transparent in these regions.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Gaseous Transparent Electrode Device

In certain optical studies, particularly where frequencies in the infrared and far infrared are employed, it is desirable to use transparent electrodes. Known transparent electrodes, such as those composed of metallic thin films and ionic solutions, are not sufficiently transparent in these regions.

The device in drawing 1 provides a transparent electrode comprising a gaseous discharge region as a conducting medium in that such gaseous discharge region is transparent to infrared and far infrared radiation. Chamber 2 houses an insulated sample 4, the object subjected to incoming light radiation 6. The sample is fixed to chamber 2 by a vacuum tight insulating connection using spring 3 to maintain chamber 2 vacuum tight and to urge electrode 5 against sample 4. Chamber 2 is filled with low pressure gas 8. Annular electrode 12 surrounds optical window 10 through which the incoming radiation passes. Electrode 14 is a second annular electrode in chamber 2.

Switch 16 connects voltage source V to electrodes 12 and 14 of chamber 2 through resistor R, establishing a gaseous glow discharge in such chamber. Modulating voltage Vm is applied between electrodes 14 and 16. A large portion of the potential drop of Vm takes place across sample 4 in that the front surface S of the sample is effectively at the same electrical potential as anode 14 due to the presence of gas discharge. Impinging light 6 is reflected from surface S and exits throug...