Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Repair Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092366D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Roth, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

The system is effective to switch out defective modules and replace them with good ones. Devices to diagnose modules and make decisions regarding their capabilities are well-known. A module good or not-good signal enters the system clock and controls and determines if the switching network configuration is to be altered after each test.

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Automatic Repair Method

The system is effective to switch out defective modules and replace them with good ones. Devices to diagnose modules and make decisions regarding their capabilities are well-known. A module good or not-good signal enters the system clock and controls and determines if the switching network configuration is to be altered after each test.

Eight inputs to the switching network are shown. There are eight inputs to the Switching Network and twelve outputs from such Network. The outputs go to similarly numbered modules not shown.

There are four horizontal rows of switching circuits in the Switching Network. There are as many switches in each row as modules. Four rows are required because, in the example, there are four spare modules. The number of rows equals the number of spares.

The system operates as follows. Consider the case where only module 5 is bad. To correct this condition, input 5 is switched to output line 4 or module which is a spare. In this case, the inputs on lines 6...12 appear on output lines
6...12. Only output line 5 is disabled. There are also no outputs on lines 1...3 as these go to the other three spares which are not needed.

The modules are tested in order, starting with module 12 and ending with module 1. The first bad module found is corrected at the 0 switching level, the second at the 1 level and so on. If more than four modules are bad, a change configuration signal is generated which is an indication to the computer...