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Selective Rotary Vacuum Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092388D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Orlando, AW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This rotatable vacuum probe selectively picks up semiconductor chips having a selected one of two possible orientations and rejects chips having the other orientation. Rectangular semiconductor chips 10 having a pair of balls 11 or projections adjacent one end are carried to the point of pick up along track 12 shown in A. Track 12 is arranged so that chips 10 can have one of two orientations when carried in a balls-up position along such track. The edge at which balls 11 are positioned can be the leading edge or the trailing edge. The vacuum probe which moves down to engage each chip 10, as in B and C, has a pair of recesses 13. The latter are disposed so as to engage the two balls at the trailing edge of a chip 10.

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Selective Rotary Vacuum Probe

This rotatable vacuum probe selectively picks up semiconductor chips having a selected one of two possible orientations and rejects chips having the other orientation. Rectangular semiconductor chips 10 having a pair of balls 11 or projections adjacent one end are carried to the point of pick up along track 12 shown in A. Track 12 is arranged so that chips 10 can have one of two orientations when carried in a balls-up position along such track. The edge at which balls 11 are positioned can be the leading edge or the trailing edge. The vacuum probe which moves down to engage each chip 10, as in B and C, has a pair of recesses 13. The latter are disposed so as to engage the two balls at the trailing edge of a chip 10. Thus, as in B, when chips 10 having an orientation with balls 11 near the trailing edge engage the probe, balls 11 nest within recesses 13. A chip 10 then completes the vacuum being applied to conduit 14 and the probe picks up a chip 10.

On the other hand, as in C, when a chip 10 having balls 11 proximate the leading edge of the chip engages the probe, balls 11 do not nest within recesses 13 and the vacuum within conduit 14 is not completed. The resulting depletion of the vacuum within conduit 14 activates a mechanism, not shown, to blow the chip 10 away from the probe.

The probe bearing a properly seated chip, as in D, is rotatably mounted on support 15. Then, in order to rotate the probe containing the chip 10 into a pr...