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Electrochemical Cells

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092407D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Phillips, SL: AUTHOR

Abstract

A surface film is formed on a mercury electrode when tetrabutylam-monium ions are added to certain electrolytic cells. An electrochemical time-delay cell based on the formation of this surface film is made by using mercury-saturated calomel electrodes and an electrolyte solution of lead (II), perchloric acid, and the aforementioned ion. The passage of current through the cell results in the plating of lead on a mercury electrode.

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Electrochemical Cells

A surface film is formed on a mercury electrode when tetrabutylam-monium ions are added to certain electrolytic cells. An electrochemical time-delay cell based on the formation of this surface film is made by using mercury-saturated calomel electrodes and an electrolyte solution of lead (II), perchloric acid, and the aforementioned ion. The passage of current through the cell results in the plating of lead on a mercury electrode.

The tetrabutylammonium ion absorbs on the plated electrode to form a surface film. Penetration of the surface film by the lead requires time for the current to return to the proper value. This delay is dependent on the ion concentration. As the concentration is increased, the delay begins sooner and continues longer.

A timer cutoff cell based on the formation of a surface film is made by substituting an electrolyte solution of the tetrabutylammonium ion, cadmium (L) and perchloric acid. The passage of current causes plating of cadmium on the plated mercury electrode.

The tetrabutyl-ammonium absorbs onto the mercury electrode to form a surface film. The current then falls essentially to zero so that the circuit is open. The concentration determines the period of time before cutoff.

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