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Ring Circuit with Inhibit Feedback

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092506D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clapper, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The ring circuit has a positive DC feedback rather than an AC transient feedback. Such DC feedback inhibits stages which were previously on from subsequently turning on during a progression of the ring. A stage is turned on only when the previous stage is on for some minimum time interval and a ring drive pulse is present. The stage in question turns on and remains in that state with no race or pulse overriding conditions. When it turns on, the preceding stage is turned off and is held off. The arrangement can be extended to hold off as many preceding stages as is desirable, thus making possible a one only stage on condition. In general, the clamping of the preceding stage to its off condition is sufficient to provide reliable operation under severe conditions, such as stop-start operations.

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Ring Circuit with Inhibit Feedback

The ring circuit has a positive DC feedback rather than an AC transient feedback. Such DC feedback inhibits stages which were previously on from subsequently turning on during a progression of the ring. A stage is turned on only when the previous stage is on for some minimum time interval and a ring drive pulse is present. The stage in question turns on and remains in that state with no race or pulse overriding conditions. When it turns on, the preceding stage is turned off and is held off. The arrangement can be extended to hold off as many preceding stages as is desirable, thus making possible a one only stage on condition. In general, the clamping of the preceding stage to its off condition is sufficient to provide reliable operation under severe conditions, such as stop- start operations. Since there is no transient coupling between the ring positions, the circuitry is free from noise and also requires little or no filtering of the voltage sources.

Two stages are shown. A negative-going reset pulse applied on the reset line turns off all stages and sets on the first stage at the end of such pulse. Stage one, being on, has transistors T1 and T2 conducting and transistor T3 turned off. The second stage has transistors T4 and T5 in their cutoff stage and T6 conducting. Under these conditions the voltage at Out 2 is at approximately - 12 volts, for example. The voltage at Out 1 is near ground, which provides a gating signal for...