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Producing Magnetic Recording Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092541D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kay, C: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Compositions containing particulate magnetic recording particles in a binder are used to produce magnetic recording media. Conductive particles are often added to such a composition during its production in order to control the resistance of the final magnetic recording media. Carbon particles in one form or another are commonly used as the conductive material.

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Producing Magnetic Recording Media

Compositions containing particulate magnetic recording particles in a binder are used to produce magnetic recording media. Conductive particles are often added to such a composition during its production in order to control the resistance of the final magnetic recording media. Carbon particles in one form or another are commonly used as the conductive material.

Addition of sufficient carbon to the composition to control resistance causes a sharp reduction in the signal output in the resulting magnetic recording media. While a certain amount of signal loss is normally expected, due to the volume which the carbon particles occupy, the signal loss actually experienced is far in excess of that which would be expected in view of the relatively small amount of carbon used. This high signal loss is referred to as pigment shock.

By adding the carbon particles slowly over a 2 to 3 hour period, signal loss due to pigment shock is greatly reduced. It is desirable to add the carbon particles after the magnetic composition has achieved a high degree of dispersion but before it is removed from the dispersing equipment. Pigment shock occurs whenever a magnetic dispersion is diluted in an undesirable manner. Slow addition of any diluting material to a magnetic dispersion avoids pigment shock.

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