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Browse Prior Art Database

Memory Relocate Stack Usage Algorithm

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092700D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frye, HE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An associative memory has an array or stack 10 of registers 1... 8 built with shift cells or triggers having the ability to shift downward as new entries are added to the top of the stack. When the stack is full of entries, any lower entry in it is returned to the top of the stack by a re-entry path to automatically establish the highest priority for each entry as it is used. Any higher entries are pushed down one level. Any new entrie s added to the stack push the entry in register 8 out of the stack. Thus, high-iisage entries remain in the stack while low-usage entries are gradually pushed down and out. An alternative to this algorithm is to return only those entries in, for example, the four lowest levels 5... 8, as they are used.

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Memory Relocate Stack Usage Algorithm

An associative memory has an array or stack 10 of registers 1... 8 built with shift cells or triggers having the ability to shift downward as new entries are added to the top of the stack. When the stack is full of entries, any lower entry in it is returned to the top of the stack by a re-entry path to automatically establish the highest priority for each entry as it is used. Any higher entries are pushed down one level. Any new entrie s added to the stack push the entry in register 8 out of the stack. Thus, high-iisage entries remain in the stack while low-usage entries are gradually pushed down and out. An alternative to this algorithm is to return only those entries in, for example, the four lowest levels 5... 8, as they are used. Thus, an entry placed at the top remains in its relative position until it reaches the lower levels. Again, low-usage entries are gradually pushed down and out. In both cases, the relative priority of each entry is established as a function of its use while it is maintained in the associative memory.

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