Browse Prior Art Database

Washing Microelectronic Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092879D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, FW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Microelectronic circuit module surfaces are washed by jetting a mixture of compressed air and a volatile liquid against the surfaces. The liquid is nonreactive with the module elements, nonflamnnable and does not affect the electrical properties of the components. Perchlorethylene is the preferred liquid but trichlorethylene and FREON* are satisfactory. * Trademark of E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Co.

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Washing Microelectronic Modules

Microelectronic circuit module surfaces are washed by jetting a mixture of compressed air and a volatile liquid against the surfaces. The liquid is nonreactive with the module elements, nonflamnnable and does not affect the electrical properties of the components. Perchlorethylene is the preferred liquid but trichlorethylene and FREON* are satisfactory. * Trademark of E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Co.

The apparatus simultaneously washes aplurality of rows of modules. Modules 10 are moved in rows mounted on racks 11 along tracks 19 in the direction indicated by the arrow past jet washing devices 12 mounted on support 18. In devices 12, liquid perchlorethylene is conveyed by conduit 13 to nozzle 14. Here it meets and mixes with downwardly directed compressed air from conduit 15. The resulting mixture is expelled from nozzle 14 as jet spray 16 against module surface 17.

While this method can be used to clean substrates, e. g., ceramic substrates prior to the formation of the circuit elements or at subsequent stages of circuit formation, it is particularly effective in cleaning the surfaces after the abrading of thin-film resistors by sand-blasting techniques. After this abrading or trimming step, impurities such as alumina contaminate the surface and interfere with the subsequent placement of the semiconductor chips on the substrate unless removed by this method.

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