Browse Prior Art Database

Valve Housing and Mixer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092880D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carr, BT: AUTHOR

Abstract

The valve housing and mixer are for dispensing a mixture of reactive components such as an epoxy resin and a hardener. Mixing takes place at a downstream point away from the dispensing valves. This prevents a buildup of reacted components on a dispensing valve with a resultant failure of the valve to close or to open when required.

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Valve Housing and Mixer

The valve housing and mixer are for dispensing a mixture of reactive components such as an epoxy resin and a hardener. Mixing takes place at a downstream point away from the dispensing valves. This prevents a buildup of reacted components on a dispensing valve with a resultant failure of the valve to close or to open when required.

Block 1 has opposed ports 2 for the hardener and resin components respectively. Ball check valve 4 in each port 2 prevents a back flow of material into the pressure and supply line 5 for each valve 4. Each port 2 is connected by channel 6 to mixing chamber 7 where the two components are mixed. The areas of channels 6 are proportioned in accordance with the amount of material to be passed through them. Thus a proper hardener-resin ratio is maintained throughout the dispensing period. The discharge from chamber 7 can be through nozzle 8 or some other delivery device.

As the reactive and mixed components cannot remain in channel 6 and chamber 7 for a long enough period to allow them to solidify, each port 2 is provided with check valves 9. These are connected by conduits 10 to a flushing solvent source. Whenever cleaning is needed, the solvent or solvents are forced through valves 9 to wash the hardener or resin component from the exposed parts of valves 4 and to flush out channels 6, chamber 7, and nozzle 8. Thus any buildup of hardened resin with a resultant mixing or dispensing failure is prevented.

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