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Transistor Use in Transducer Recovery

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092924D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Woelkers, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Transistor T2 conducts when transistor T1 is turned off to prevent the generation of large voltages across transformer TR. T2 is normally off. However, when T1 is turned off, the voltage developed across transformer winding TR2 increases sufficiently to bias T2 conductive thus providing a low-impedance shunt around TR2. This nonlinear low-impedance shunt discharges TR in the shortest permissable time and, in so doing, limits the voltage that can be developed on the collector of T1. Thus it prevents possible destruction of T1. T2 is a PNP transistor. An NPN transistor can be substituted by reversing the emitter and collector connections to T2.

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Transistor Use in Transducer Recovery

Transistor T2 conducts when transistor T1 is turned off to prevent the generation of large voltages across transformer TR. T2 is normally off. However, when T1 is turned off, the voltage developed across transformer winding TR2 increases sufficiently to bias T2 conductive thus providing a low- impedance shunt around TR2. This nonlinear low-impedance shunt discharges TR in the shortest permissable time and, in so doing, limits the voltage that can be developed on the collector of T1. Thus it prevents possible destruction of T1. T2 is a PNP transistor. An NPN transistor can be substituted by reversing the emitter and collector connections to T2.

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