Browse Prior Art Database

Chemical Development System for Images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092963D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kornei, O: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A copying process is known in which the original to be copied is coated with a material, which is readily absorbed in the background areas of the original, but to a much lesser degree in the printed areas. This results in a differential absorption between the image and nonimage areas and can be utilized for the production of latent oil images. Thus, in the next step of the process, the oil remaining on the printed areas is transferred by an element, such as a roller, to a copy paper. The oil image on the copy paper is then rendered visible by applying toner particles.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 85% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Chemical Development System for Images

A copying process is known in which the original to be copied is coated with a material, which is readily absorbed in the background areas of the original, but to a much lesser degree in the printed areas. This results in a differential absorption between the image and nonimage areas and can be utilized for the production of latent oil images. Thus, in the next step of the process, the oil remaining on the printed areas is transferred by an element, such as a roller, to a copy paper. The oil image on the copy paper is then rendered visible by applying toner particles.

The oil image can be rendered visible by incorporating iodine, such as in the form of potassium iodine, in the oil applied to the original. After the iodine-oil solution is transferred to the copy paper, it is rendered visible by applying a starch solution to the copy paper thus causing a starch-iodide reaction and the characteristic purple color of the end product.

Examples of the oil solution and the starch solution for the above-described process are as follows:
Oil Solution Potassium Iodide (KI) 10 g

Water to dissolve above 6 ml.

Gylcerol (acting as transfer oil and 20 g

wetting agent)

Oleic Acid (main transfer oil) 20 g

Alcohol to make 4 oz. of

solution

Starch Solution for Nonstarch Containing Paper Potassium Iodate (KIO(3)) 2.25 g +

Soluble potato starch solution (1%) 2 oz.

Glacial Acetic acid 10 ml.

Hexylene glycol 10 g

Distilled water to make 4 oz. of

so...