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Printed Circuit Manufacturing Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092989D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Valstyn, EP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Repetitive printed circuit patterns are deposited by evaporation through a mask having as many holes as there are patterns to be deposited. The holes are arranged with center-to-center spacing equal to the center-to-center spacing of the patterns. The lateral dimensions of each hole are much less than the dimensions of the patterns. The mask is positioned close to the substrate and during evaporation is moved back and forth in all directions until the desired patterns are formed. This tecknique is particularly useful for the manufacture of thin magnetic film storage arrays where the same mask can be used for depositing the strip conductors, the magnetic films and the intermediate insulating layers. By appropriate programming of the motion of the mask, the deposited patterns can be given any desired profile.

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Printed Circuit Manufacturing Technique

Repetitive printed circuit patterns are deposited by evaporation through a mask having as many holes as there are patterns to be deposited. The holes are arranged with center-to-center spacing equal to the center-to-center spacing of the patterns. The lateral dimensions of each hole are much less than the dimensions of the patterns. The mask is positioned close to the substrate and during evaporation is moved back and forth in all directions until the desired patterns are formed. This tecknique is particularly useful for the manufacture of thin magnetic film storage arrays where the same mask can be used for depositing the strip conductors, the magnetic films and the intermediate insulating layers. By appropriate programming of the motion of the mask, the deposited patterns can be given any desired profile. In magnetic stores, it is often desirable to taper the edges of the thin films and strip conductors.

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