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Preparation of High Strength Materials by Controlling the Dispersion of a Second Phase

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093124D
Original Publication Date: 1967-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mader, SR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the publication "Preparation of Mechanically Hard Spring-Like Materials" by J. F. Freedman and S. I. Metkessel on pages 521 and 522 of the October 1966, Vol. 9, No. 5 issue of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, a method is set forth for making small springs, plates or similar elements capable of storing mechanical energy. The following description is an outgrowth of that publication and deals with a method of producing a controlled dispersion of a second phase in a metal matrix by specific thin-film deposition techniques so as to fabricate films or foils of unusual strength properties which cannot be produced in bulk form.

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Preparation of High Strength Materials by Controlling the Dispersion of a Second Phase

In the publication "Preparation of Mechanically Hard Spring-Like Materials" by J. F. Freedman and S. I. Metkessel on pages 521 and 522 of the October 1966, Vol. 9, No. 5 issue of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, a method is set forth for making small springs, plates or similar elements capable of storing mechanical energy. The following description is an outgrowth of that publication and deals with a method of producing a controlled dispersion of a second phase in a metal matrix by specific thin-film deposition techniques so as to fabricate films or foils of unusual strength properties which cannot be produced in bulk form.

Examples of the strengthening of metals occur when alloys are formed in which a second phase is finely dispersed in a base metal matrix. It is preferable that the second phase have high-strength properties, but this phase can even be brittle as long as it is discontinuous and occupies only a small fraction of the total volume.

To introduce such a second phase requires a first condition of limited solubility of metal B in A at low temperatures and a second condition of more extensive solubility at some elevated temperature. The reason for the latter is that to form finely dispersed particles of the second phase requires a solid-state reaction, e.g., precipitation or eutectoid decomposition. where diffusion is slow enough that particle size can be kept small through heat treatments.

If it is necessary to pass through a solidification procedure, the size of second-phase particles is so large that they are ineffectual in producing strengthening. The second condition places a severe limitation on the choice of binary system which can be used in bulk, namely, it must be less than the maximum solubility at the elevated temperatures. In thin-film deposition, however, this limitation no longe...