Browse Prior Art Database

Electrical Contacts for Semiconductor Chips

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093195D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method provides improved contacts for semiconductor devices such as chips. Solder is applied to the device substrate in the selected areas where the contacts are to be formed. The substrate of the device is then inverted. Heat is applied to the device, preferably in a hydrogen atmosphere, to cause the solder to flow into the form of uniform suspended contacts.

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Electrical Contacts for Semiconductor Chips

This method provides improved contacts for semiconductor devices such as chips. Solder is applied to the device substrate in the selected areas where the contacts are to be formed. The substrate of the device is then inverted. Heat is applied to the device, preferably in a hydrogen atmosphere, to cause the solder to flow into the form of uniform suspended contacts.

The chip in drawing A comprises semiconductor material 10 coated with an electrically insulating layer of glass 11. The semiconductor substrate is uncovered through apertures 12 formed in glass 11 in the areas where electrical contacts are to be formed. Using a suitable masking technique not shown, solder mounds 13 are deposited at the contact points. Mounds 13 fill apertures 12 and extend onto glass 11 in the areas surrounding apertures 12 as in drawing B. The chip is then inverted so that the solder mounds face downward. Sufficient heat is applied, preferably in a hydrogen atmosphere, to cause mounds 13 to flow. The solder dewets from glass 11 in the areas surrounding the aperture and, by virtue of surface tension, form elongated tear-shaped contacts up on cooling as in drawing C.

These contacts can now be positioned upon a suitable conductive land pattern on a dielectric substrate in the formation of a microelectronic circuit structure.

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