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Deposition of Silicon Nitride by RF Sputtering in Ammonia and Argon Mixture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093199D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hu, SM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Silicon nitride can be RF reactively sputtered by using a silicon cathode and a gaseous mixture of ammonia and argon. Silicon nitride films are produced in an ammonia and argon gas atmosphere with 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 20% by volume ammonia and the remainder argon. The RF power density is 1.7 watts/cm. The results are that the maximum rate of deposition, 51 A/o//min. at 1.7 watts/cm, is obtained with the 5% ammonia atmosphere. Higher ammonia concentrations give a lower rate of deposition. Below 2% ammonia, the silicon nitride is either of poor quality or does not form at all. The silicon nitride film resulting from the 5% ammonia atmosphere shows an extremely high resistivity of greater than 10 /16/ ohm-cm. at an applied field of 2 x 10/6/volts/cm.

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Deposition of Silicon Nitride by RF Sputtering in Ammonia and Argon Mixture

Silicon nitride can be RF reactively sputtered by using a silicon cathode and a gaseous mixture of ammonia and argon. Silicon nitride films are produced in an ammonia and argon gas atmosphere with 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 20% by volume ammonia and the remainder argon. The RF power density is 1.7 watts/cm. The results are that the maximum rate of deposition, 51 A/o//min. at
1.7 watts/cm, is obtained with the 5% ammonia atmosphere. Higher ammonia concentrations give a lower rate of deposition. Below 2% ammonia, the silicon nitride is either of poor quality or does not form at all. The silicon nitride film resulting from the 5% ammonia atmosphere shows an extremely high resistivity of greater than 10 /16/ ohm-cm. at an applied field of 2 x 10/6/volts/cm. The rate of deposition and efficiency of the process can be increased by preionizing the ammonia prior to admitting it to the sputtering chamber. The advantages of this process over RF sputtering in pure nitrogen are the expected better stoichiometry in the silicon nitride films obtained and, hence, the higher resistance to electronic conduction.

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