Browse Prior Art Database

Changeable Key Identification

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093227D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, DD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The characters or symbols that respectively identify the various keys of a photocomposing machine or other keyboard-operated machine can be rapidly and accurately changed. This is effected by electro-optical devices to correspond with each change of the character system in which it is desired to express the composed information.

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Changeable Key Identification

The characters or symbols that respectively identify the various keys of a photocomposing machine or other keyboard-operated machine can be rapidly and accurately changed. This is effected by electro-optical devices to correspond with each change of the character system in which it is desired to express the composed information.

Many composing operations require at least occasional changes of the character system or symbol system in which the composed information is to be expressed. This is especially true of photocomposing operations, where such changes are apt to occur rather often. Under such conditions it is inconvenient to use changeable key overlays or cross-reference charts in order to identify each key with the symbol which it should represent in the new character system. To avoid this difficulty, changeable key identifications are formed by selectively illuminating a matrix of electroluminescent elements located in each keytop, according to the character or symbol which is to be displayed by that key.

Keytop 1, drawing A, made of translucent plastic or other light transmitting material, contains a number of light-emitting diodes or cells 2, drawing B, arranged in an 8 by 12 matrix, for example. Cells 2 are selectively energized to display a character or symbol 3 formed by the combination of illuminated cells. The electric circuits for energizing these cells extend through conductors 4 in keyshank 5. Each time that the symbol...