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Cloth Cutter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093230D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

French, WK: AUTHOR

Abstract

Electronic digital computers can be programmed to take a basic garment design in a single size and scale it up and down to produce the complete gamut of sizes necessary. The computer output is a tape which contains the successive coordinates of each garment component in the various sizes. This tape is then used to control a cloth cutter. The latter follows the tape instructions to trace out the pattern and cut a multiplicity of pieces from a pile of stacked fabric.

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Cloth Cutter

Electronic digital computers can be programmed to take a basic garment design in a single size and scale it up and down to produce the complete gamut of sizes necessary. The computer output is a tape which contains the successive coordinates of each garment component in the various sizes. This tape is then used to control a cloth cutter. The latter follows the tape instructions to trace out the pattern and cut a multiplicity of pieces from a pile of stacked fabric.

The apparatus is particularly suited for following the taped instructions and cutting the cloth without the need of clamping the piled fabric between form boards, or using a shoe beneath the fabric. The multiple layers of fabric lie loosely on a table covered with a stiff pile material. The latter is capable of supporting the pile of fabric but yields to the passage of the cutter to provide a so-called self-healing table. The cutter itself is similar to an electric carving knife except that there is a stationary blade with a T-shaped slot in which a movable blade oscillates. Both legs of the stationary blade and the movable blade are serrated to provide a shearing action. Such obviates the problem of buckling the fabric.

A shoe on the stationary blade serves to compress the fabric.

The cutter is mounted on orthogonal feeding devices which receive the successive coordinate instructions from the computer tape to trace and cut the various patterns.

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