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Electrodeposition of Polymeric Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093259D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Orinik, MT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Electrodeposition of polymeric materials provides a rapid coating process. Such electrodeposition also permits concentrating the coating on the surface of a nonconducting porous substrate without saturating the internal fibers.

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Electrodeposition of Polymeric Materials

Electrodeposition of polymeric materials provides a rapid coating process. Such electrodeposition also permits concentrating the coating on the surface of a nonconducting porous substrate without saturating the internal fibers.

At A, a polymeric solution, dispersion or emulsion 1, such as polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, polyester, epoxy, etc., is placed in container 2 having electrodes 3 and 4. The latter serve as the anode and cathode. Upon the application of a suitable potential, solution 1 is electrolyzed causing electrodeposition of a positively charged polymer on the cathode or a negatively charged polymer on the anode.

Upon placing porous, nonconducting substrate 5 in contact with the electrode at which deposition occurs, the charged polymer deposits on the fibers in contact with the electrode. Polymer layer 6 builds in thickness from the electrode- substrate interface into the porous substrate.

Continuous coating can be done as in B. This is effected by providing rotating drum 8 to move web 9 of porous substrate material slowly along electrode 10.

By choosing the proper pore size in relation to the polymer particle, passage of the polymer can be prevented so that coating occurs on the opposite side of the substrate. The charge on polymers varies such that, by proper choice, electrodeposition can occur at either electrode.

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