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System for Rapid Access of Long Messages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093278D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lem, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In man-computer interaction, a reasonable turnaround time is desired. However, if long responses from the computer are required, the search time is generally too long, especially for long audio responses. Rapid access to long messages can be obtained by using multiple storage devices and dividing a long message into progressively longer sections. The system can be implemented using various storage media such as disks, data cells, tapes or drums.

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System for Rapid Access of Long Messages

In man-computer interaction, a reasonable turnaround time is desired. However, if long responses from the computer are required, the search time is generally too long, especially for long audio responses. Rapid access to long messages can be obtained by using multiple storage devices and dividing a long message into progressively longer sections. The system can be implemented using various storage media such as disks, data cells, tapes or drums.

A magnetic tape implementation capable of providing, for example, 80 audio messages of 2 1/2 minutes each with a maximum random access time of 10 seconds and an average access time of 6.25 seconds is described.

Five tape players are used, each tape having a fraction of each of the 80 messages. The first tape has the first 9 seconds of each message. The second tape has the following 13 seconds of each message. The third tape has the next 26 seconds of each message. The fourth tape has the next 52 seconds of each message. The fifth tape has the final 50 seconds of each message.

The 80 messages are divided into five parts to provide low random access time to any message. Playback and search speeds of 1 7/8 inch/second and 75 inch/second are assumed, with a 1 7/8 inch inter record gap. While access to the first part of any message can be less than 5 seconds, a minimum delay of 5 seconds on the first tape is forced and the necessary 2 1/2 minute message length is made possible.

The draw...