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Browse Prior Art Database

Position Resolution System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093310D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reynolds, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In photographic type storage devices, information is stored by establishing interference patterns in a photographic emulsion. Such an interference pattern can be used to form an arrangement of verniers. Such arrangement is utilized in this system to accomplish the precise registration of the information storage device in the information readout apparatus after processing of the emulsion.

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Position Resolution System

In photographic type storage devices, information is stored by establishing interference patterns in a photographic emulsion. Such an interference pattern can be used to form an arrangement of verniers. Such arrangement is utilized in this system to accomplish the precise registration of the information storage device in the information readout apparatus after processing of the emulsion.

Photographic information plate 1 is coarsely registered in the readout apparatus by locating it in position with support base 2 at a set of registration pins 3 that are capable of establishing tolerances from 12 to 25 microns. After this coarse registration takes place the system is registered with a fine position servo control. The latter system includes vernier plates 4, 5, and 6 set into support base 2. Masks 7, 8 and 9 in information plate 1 correspond to verniers 4, 5, and 6. The latter can be formed using the Lippmann standing wave recording technique. Clear and opaque masking bars 10 and 11 are formed on masks 7, 8, and 9 to enable the vernier sets to sense x, y and angular positions.

A light source provides a beam that sequentially shines on the verniers. The light beam passes through lenses 12, 13, and 14 and the beam floods the entire vernier section. For example, the light passing through lens 13 and beam splitter 17 passes through mask 7 to vernier 4. The light striking vernier 4 is reflected back to beam splitter 17 and a lens system formed of lenses 18 and 19. The latter are arranged to provide a view of the pattern of mask 7 overlaying vernier
4. Lens 18 is uniformly illum...