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Browse Prior Art Database

Color Display System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093311D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, FP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Color pictures can be simulated by a black and white television tube. White-light pulsations cause subjective sensations due to a psychological effect called the Benham Wheel Effect and described in "The Prevost-Fechner-Benham Subjective Colors," Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 46, No. 2, March 1949, pp.97-136, by J. Cohen and D. Gordon. By enclosing appropriate white-light pulsations as binary signals, visual image can be placed in a storage, such as a read-only memory, for successive display as moving color pictures. For example the white-light pulsations necessary to subjectively produce the color red, can be encoded into binary signals 1, as shown in the wave-form diagram, and stored in column 2 of color table memory 3.

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Color Display System

Color pictures can be simulated by a black and white television tube. White- light pulsations cause subjective sensations due to a psychological effect called the Benham Wheel Effect and described in "The Prevost-Fechner-Benham Subjective Colors," Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 46, No. 2, March 1949, pp.97- 136, by J. Cohen and D. Gordon. By enclosing appropriate white-light pulsations as binary signals, visual image can be placed in a storage, such as a read-only memory, for successive display as moving color pictures. For example the white- light pulsations necessary to subjectively produce the color red, can be encoded into binary signals 1, as shown in the wave-form diagram, and stored in column 2 of color table memory 3.

When red is needed for a point in an image, the bits of column 2 in table 3 are sequentially supplied to blanking input 4 of display tube 5 to cause the desired point on the display tube 5 face to pulsate in a manner providing the sensation simulating red. Similarly, white-light pulsations simulating other colors can be encoded and stored in columns of the color table 3.

Complete color pictures can be produced on the display tube 5 face in accordance with corresponding video information received from input 6 and stored in video storage 7. If the contents of storage 7 are appropriately renewed, successive images simulate a moving color picture. Information in storage 7 is represented by words, each referring to a point on the tube 5 face and each being stored in a different row. Color code section 8 of each word identifies the color of the point referred to by horizontal 9 and vertical 10 sections of the word. For example, the tube 5 electron beam is positioned to point 1, 2 by the first word which specifies, in one-out-of-four code, that this point is colored red. A comparator...