Browse Prior Art Database

Diode Reverse Recovery Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093332D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Grzyb, JD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The speed of a diode turnoff in a circuit module 1 is a parameter which must be known. This speed is determined, with reference to B, by the amount of minority carriers 2 and 3 at a PN junction 4, the lifetime of these carriers, and also by the value of the current which turns the diode off.

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Diode Reverse Recovery Testing

The speed of a diode turnoff in a circuit module 1 is a parameter which must be known. This speed is determined, with reference to B, by the amount of minority carriers 2 and 3 at a PN junction 4, the lifetime of these carriers, and also by the value of the current which turns the diode off.

The circuit shown in A tests a parameter of diodes, e. g., on modules, which can be correlated to both diode reverse recovery and diode stored charge. In operation, diode D1, of a series of input diodes 5...8, is turned on and has a forward current I flowing through it. Diode D2 is an input diode also and is turned on. D2 has a small forward current flowing through it of approximately 0.3 ma. This is enough to put the diode in a very low-impedance state.

An input ramp voltage, drawing C, is applied through transmission line 9, having a 2 volt amplitude and a 5 ns rise time. Coaxial transmission line 10 is used as a terminating resistor for line 9 and also serves as a path for all of the
0.3 ma input diode current. The current for diode under test D1 and for D2 is fed through resistor 11 a part of a diode input logic block on module 1.

When the input ramp of the applied voltage reaches D2, it then turns D2 on even more. Since D2 is in a low dynamic impedance state, the voltage across it remains constant. With the ramp voltage AC coupled, the voltage at point 12 follows the shape of the input voltage ramp. As the ramp of the input voltage goes neg...