Browse Prior Art Database

Selected Area Integral Device Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093334D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lyons, VJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventional masking layers, for example, silicon dioxide and glasses, can be used in a solid-liquid-vapor method for epitaxial growth in openings of the mask on a semiconductor substrate. A typical process using a monocrystalline silicon substrate of P-type material is initiated after providing suitable openings in a silicon dioxide masking layer. The process is effected by heating the masked silicon substrate to an elevated temperature of about 1100-1200 degrees C and then exposing the substrate to a gaseous ambient including hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen chloride and a species containing a liquid alloy-forming element such as cadmium or zinc. After forming a thin liquid alloy film, additional cadmium or zinc is added from the vapor phase.

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Selected Area Integral Device Substrates

Conventional masking layers, for example, silicon dioxide and glasses, can be used in a solid-liquid-vapor method for epitaxial growth in openings of the mask on a semiconductor substrate. A typical process using a monocrystalline silicon substrate of P-type material is initiated after providing suitable openings in a silicon dioxide masking layer. The process is effected by heating the masked silicon substrate to an elevated temperature of about 1100-1200 degrees C and then exposing the substrate to a gaseous ambient including hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen chloride and a species containing a liquid alloy-forming element such as cadmium or zinc. After forming a thin liquid alloy film, additional cadmium or zinc is added from the vapor phase. This is done in order to increase the depth of penetration of the solid-liquid interface to the desired distance from the liquid surface.

An N-type directing impurity, such as arsenic, is then added from a vapor phase species to the liquid alloy. Epitaxial growth from the liquid is accomplished by decreasing the cadmium or zinc concentration in the melt through vapor phase composition control. The process is then halted momentarily while the arsenic concentration in the remaining liquid is decreased to the desired level by decreasing the concentration of the gaseous arsenic containing species. The growth process is then continued to completion. During the process, the conce...