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Localized Microwave Heated Dielectric Glass

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093335D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crawford, DW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Dielectric glasses are generally used in conjunction with semiconductor devices such as transistors, diodes, and monolithic integrated circuits. Such glasses are utilized for hermetically sealing such devices, for glass seals around metal leads and for aiding in joining semiconductor chips to substrates made of a composition such as ceramic material. Ferroelectric materials such as titanium dioxide, lead zirconium oxide, barium zirconium oxide, and lead titanate are added to conventional lead borosilicate glasses to form a glass composition useful for the uses stated. The glasses of this type can be melted by microwave heating.

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Localized Microwave Heated Dielectric Glass

Dielectric glasses are generally used in conjunction with semiconductor devices such as transistors, diodes, and monolithic integrated circuits. Such glasses are utilized for hermetically sealing such devices, for glass seals around metal leads and for aiding in joining semiconductor chips to substrates made of a composition such as ceramic material. Ferroelectric materials such as titanium dioxide, lead zirconium oxide, barium zirconium oxide, and lead titanate are added to conventional lead borosilicate glasses to form a glass composition useful for the uses stated. The glasses of this type can be melted by microwave heating. Microwave heating of the glass composition is strictly a local heating process so that other components of the semiconductor device package such as silicon, alumina and metals are only slightly heated in the time it takes to fuse the glass composition into a continuous glass body. The microwave energy strikes the glass composition and is absorbed and the glass is heated. However, the other materials in the semiconductor device package do not materially absorb the microwave energy and therefore are not heated.

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