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Traveling Wave Optical Transducer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093389D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gunn, JB: AUTHOR

Abstract

The traveling-wave optical transducer utilizes an electro-optical effect to derive an electrical signal from an optical signal. The latter is directed along a crystalline body in which DC polarization accompanies the passage of such optical signal.

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Traveling Wave Optical Transducer

The traveling-wave optical transducer utilizes an electro-optical effect to derive an electrical signal from an optical signal. The latter is directed along a crystalline body in which DC polarization accompanies the passage of such optical signal.

Transducer 1 of A and B comprises an elongated crystal 3, e.g., of potassium di-hydrogen phosphate KDP. This exhibits DC polarization in response to an optical signal directed through it. Crystal 3 is centrally located in a matched transmission line system comprising conductors 5 and 7. Pulsed optical signal 9 is directed into crystal 3 and induces a moving DC polarization pattern 11 such that a voltage is developed across opposite major surfaces 13 and 15 of crystal 3, coupled to the transmission lines 3 and 5 in a travelling-wave manner.

Electrical signal 17, induced along the transmission line system, produces the envelope of the optical signal along crystal 3. To achieve maximum coupling, the velocities of moving DC polarization pattern 11 and electrical signal 17, induced along conductors 5 and 7, should be in synchronism. The transmission line system is arranged such that the electrical phase velocity along conductors 5 and 7 is equal to the velocity of light in crystal 3. This is realized, for example, by proper apportioning of the respective widths W1 and W2 of crystal 3 and conductors 5 and 7 or by propagating the optical signal at a slight angle or in zig- zag fashion along c...