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Multiple Independent Mode Conjugate Laser Resonator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093393D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wieder, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

In this laser resonator, the end mirror surfaces are conjugate surfaces for a series of independent parallel modes. The resonator consists of a pair of plane parallel mirrors 1 and 2 placed on either side of active medium 3. A fly's eye lens 4 is placed in front of at least one of the mirrors, as in the drawing, or alternatively, a fly's eye lens can be placed in front of both mirrors. Each mode terminates in a plane parallel beam on mirror 2 and in a focused point on mirror 1. If two fly's eye lenses are included in the structure, the mode is focused on both mirrors.

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Multiple Independent Mode Conjugate Laser Resonator

In this laser resonator, the end mirror surfaces are conjugate surfaces for a series of independent parallel modes. The resonator consists of a pair of plane parallel mirrors 1 and 2 placed on either side of active medium 3. A fly's eye lens 4 is placed in front of at least one of the mirrors, as in the drawing, or alternatively, a fly's eye lens can be placed in front of both mirrors. Each mode terminates in a plane parallel beam on mirror 2 and in a focused point on mirror
1. If two fly's eye lenses are included in the structure, the mode is focused on both mirrors.

The resonator provides modes which are completely independent when operated simultaneously. This provides advantages in several different applications. Error example, in conjunction with an array of photodetectors, each mode can operate as an optical switch in a multichannel circuit. Each mode can be turned on or off independently by one of a series of electro-optic controls placed in the mirror plane.

Certain logic functions can be performed by coupled cavities. If the on-off function is performed by a variable reflectivity window, the modes of this cavity can be coupled to others in adjacent cavities. Each channel can provide a separate computer that which can be operated in parallel with others.

The resonator can also be used as a display and has the advantage of retaining stored information until acted upon by modulating or switching devices. I...