Browse Prior Art Database

Oriental Typewriter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093402D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lahr, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

An oriental typewriter can be constructed primarily as an optical and electrical device rather than primarily as a mechanical device. The roughly 10,000 characters for printing are made available by provision of images of them as part of 200 separate groups of transparencies. A typewriter-like keyboard of roughly 50 keys is used for selection for printing. The different transparency groups are brought into operative position by voice-controlled devices. Concurrently, the symbols then corresponding to the characters selected by each key are optically projected onto each key.

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Oriental Typewriter

An oriental typewriter can be constructed primarily as an optical and electrical device rather than primarily as a mechanical device. The roughly 10,000 characters for printing are made available by provision of images of them as part of 200 separate groups of transparencies. A typewriter-like keyboard of roughly 50 keys is used for selection for printing. The different transparency groups are brought into operative position by voice-controlled devices. Concurrently, the symbols then corresponding to the characters selected by each key are optically projected onto each key.

Typical oriental alphabets which require a printer capable of printing a very large number of characters are Kanji, Korean, and Chinese. The printer here described generates a visual output image in the oriental alphabet by use of silver halide photography techniques. Such occur generally in the same manner as is now employed by photocomposers used in the printing industry.

The transparencies for projection for printing are on a film strip. The latter is stored in strip feeding tracks and mechanisms for rapid movement to the printing optics. Mounted with each group of transparencies for printing is a group of transparencies of generally the same significance positioned for direct projection optically onto the keybuttons of the keyboard. The two corresponding groups are moved into operative position together when selected and are then halted. The transparencies for use with the keyboard are then simultaneously projected by optical devices onto the keybuttons.

In response to key depression, the characters selected for printing are individually projected from the group used for...