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Liquid Ink Electrophotographic Printing Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093403D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Medley, HC: AUTHOR

Abstract

An electrophotographic process in which the photoconductive element is reused and yet does not have to be cleaned is shown. Drum 1 carrying photoconductive layer 2 is coated with a film of dielectric ink 3 by applicator 4 rotatably mounted in reservoir 5. Ink 3 is smoothed by doctor blade 6 followed by being uniformly electrostatically charged by corona unit 7. Upon exposure to a light image reflected off document 8, the electrostatic charges in the exposed areas are dissipated causing the formation of a deformation image. Continued rotation of drum 1 brings the deformed image to a position adjacent copy sheet 9. The latter has an electrode, such as a conductive roller, of the proper polarity and magnitude to cause ink 3 to move across the gap and onto the copy paper.

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Liquid Ink Electrophotographic Printing Method

An electrophotographic process in which the photoconductive element is reused and yet does not have to be cleaned is shown. Drum 1 carrying photoconductive layer 2 is coated with a film of dielectric ink 3 by applicator 4 rotatably mounted in reservoir 5. Ink 3 is smoothed by doctor blade 6 followed by being uniformly electrostatically charged by corona unit 7. Upon exposure to a light image reflected off document 8, the electrostatic charges in the exposed areas are dissipated causing the formation of a deformation image. Continued rotation of drum 1 brings the deformed image to a position adjacent copy sheet 9. The latter has an electrode, such as a conductive roller, of the proper polarity and magnitude to cause ink 3 to move across the gap and onto the copy paper. The copy paper is then passed through dryer 10 in which the dielectric ink is fixed to the paper. To remove any residual charges still on drum 1, the latter finishes its cycle by passing erase lamp 11 which causes the dissipation of these charges. Thus, the electrophotographic system has prepared a copy of a document and is now ready for the preparation of another copy without the necessity of cleaning drum 1.

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