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Low Temperature Methods of Densifying SiO(2) and Glass Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093437D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pliskin, WA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

These methods are for producing dense, hole-free uniform thin silicon dioxide and glass films for encapsulating semiconductor devices without exposing the films to high temperature.

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Low Temperature Methods of Densifying SiO(2) and Glass Films

These methods are for producing dense, hole-free uniform thin silicon dioxide and glass films for encapsulating semiconductor devices without exposing the films to high temperature.

Films deposited at low temperatures are generally less dense than films deposited at high temperatures. These films can be densified most effectively by heating in a moist ambient rather than in a dry ambient. There are several methods for introducing moisture to accomplish this densification.

Vapor-deposited thin films are usually porous. A technique for improving the quality consists of introducing water vapor into the system during deposition of the films. This can be conveniently accomplished by bubbling one of the gases through a water trap before introduction to the reaction tube.

RF sputtered and vapor-plated silicon dioxide and glass films can be significantly densified by heating after preparation. The densification of this type of films can be further improved without resorting to high temperatures by introduction of water to the film. A method to accomplish this consists of subjecting the film to boiling water for approximately one hour followed by heating in dry oxygen at 500 degrees C.

An alternate method of densification of such films by introducing water into the film consists of heating the film in a steam atmosphere at greater than 400 degrees C for approximately thirty minutes. This is followed by exposure...