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Atomic or Molecular Vapor Mirrors and Their Application to Laser Frequency Stabilization and Narrow Band Reflectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093506D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lurio, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

A laser is provided in which one mirror of the laser cavity includes a vapor mirror. It was observed by R. W. Wood in 1916 that, when an atomic vapor has a density such that the absorption depth in the vapor for its own resonance radiation is of the order of lambda or less, the vapor begins to reflect its own resonance radiation specularly.

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Atomic or Molecular Vapor Mirrors and Their Application to Laser Frequency Stabilization and Narrow Band Reflectors

A laser is provided in which one mirror of the laser cavity includes a vapor mirror. It was observed by R. W. Wood in 1916 that, when an atomic vapor has a density such that the absorption depth in the vapor for its own resonance radiation is of the order of lambda or less, the vapor begins to reflect its own resonance radiation specularly.

For radiation with a wavelength more than several Doppler widths away from the resonance wavelength, the vapor is transparent to such wavelength. This principle permits construction of a laser with a very narrow band mirror which can be used to frequency stabilize a laser medium which provides gain at the wavelength at which the vapor acts as a mirror.

A laser, made in accordance with Wood's discovery, shows a first laser cavity C1 comprising mirrors 2 and 4 and a ruby rod 6 optically pumped by light source
8. A Q-switching unit 10 is employed to obtain a peaked laser output. A beam- splitter 12 is made transmissive to the ruby output frequency of 0.69 mu. A second laser cavity C2 includes mirror 2 and mirror 14, the latter containing a vapor 16 housed in a glass enclosure 18. The latter is placed in oven 20 so that its contents can be vaporized. An organic dye solution 22 is selected which lases at about 0.85 mu. A representative dye is 3.3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodine.

The operation of the laser is as fol...