Browse Prior Art Database

Selective Assembly System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093580D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bederman, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Drawing A shows parts handling equipment which permits selective assembly of parts A and B. Such occurs without requiring batching of one of two types of components and only requires very small amounts of batching of other types of components. Computer 10 is used to count and monitor the components in various buffers 1...N, to compare such counts against certain limits, and to derive signals used for controlling material-handling conveyor switches and to issue reports to operators to alert them to situations requiring manual intervention.

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Selective Assembly System

Drawing A shows parts handling equipment which permits selective assembly of parts A and B. Such occurs without requiring batching of one of two types of components and only requires very small amounts of batching of other types of components. Computer 10 is used to count and monitor the components in various buffers 1...N, to compare such counts against certain limits, and to derive signals used for controlling material-handling conveyor switches and to issue reports to operators to alert them to situations requiring manual intervention. It is a selective assembly system comprising parts handling equipment to cause selective assembly of a pair of parts A and B, including devices for testing, sorting and batching one kind of component, devices for testing a second component, and use of computer 10 to interrogate the sensed information about the second component, and to dispense a correct first kind of component so that the two assembled components are properly matched.

The Type A parts pass, in sequence, through A Tester 11, which gauges the dimensions of these parts. Included in the dimensions which are measured is that dimension which is critical when the A part is subsequently assembled to a B Dart. The measured values are transmitted to computer 10 via data line 12.

Similarly, the Type B parts pass, in sequence, through B Tester 13. which gauges the dimension of these parts which is critical when the B part is subsequently assembled to an A part. The measured values are transmitted to computer 10 via data line 14.

Computer 10 stores data and determines when an A part which has come out of Tester 11, will arrive at a Diverter A16. For example, the conveyor 15 interconnecting the Tester 11 end Diverter A16 can be an indexing type and computer 10 can count the indexing cycles. Based on the dimensional data for a particular type A part, computer 10 categorize this part into one of a number of classes. One of these classes can be the reject category. For each of the nonreject categories, a buffer 17, 18...N, capable of storing a number of Type A parts, is provided. When a particular Type A part arrives at the Diverter A16, computer 10 causes such Diverter to direct this part either along the reject path or into the buffer unit which corresponds to its dimensional category.

Computer 10 also determines when a B part which has come out of Tester 13 will arrive at Assembler 20. For example, the conveyor 19 interconnecting the Tester 13 and Assembler 20 can also be an indexing type, and computer 10 can count the indexing cycles. Based on the dimensional data for a particular Type B part, computer 10 categorizes this part into one of a number of classes.

Computer 10 maintains a count of the number of Type A parts in each buffer 17, 18...N. This count can be maintained by adding one each time Diverter 16 directs a part into a buffer, and subtracting one each time a Selector 21 allows an A part to leave a buffer....