Browse Prior Art Database

Automatically Breaking Mathematical Expressions into Several Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093588D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griesmer, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The method is for the automatic breaking of mathematical expressions into segments so that each segment can be placed on a separate line. Such a method is needed, for example, in the automatic preparation of such mathematical expressions for display purposes, using graphic display units, or, equally well, hard copy units such as plotters, printers, or typesetting equipment. While no universal rules for the decomposition of mathematical equations exist, experience in the preparation of mathematical text for printing has led to the establishment and acceptance of certain conventions.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Automatically Breaking Mathematical Expressions into Several Lines

The method is for the automatic breaking of mathematical expressions into segments so that each segment can be placed on a separate line. Such a method is needed, for example, in the automatic preparation of such mathematical expressions for display purposes, using graphic display units, or, equally well, hard copy units such as plotters, printers, or typesetting equipment. While no universal rules for the decomposition of mathematical equations exist, experience in the preparation of mathematical text for printing has led to the establishment and acceptance of certain conventions.

The method is an adjunct to a large system for computing a pictorial representation of a mathematical expression from a linearized representation of the expression. In this system, four passes are made through the expression. A rewriting pass transforms the expression into a form which is more in keeping with mathematical convention. A transformation of the expression is made using a set of special picture forms. A dimensioning pass is effected to position each part of the expression properly, in the same way that it is set in type by hand. An output pass indicates the name, size, and position of each symbol.

In order to handle expressions which require more than one line, the following method is employed. Breaks in expressions are permitted at the following symbols or break characters: +, binary -, x (times sign), / (diagonal division sign), =, >, >, <, <, provided the symbol does not occur in certain types of subexpressions, such as subscripts. As these symbols...