Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Pinhole Detection in SiO(2) and Photoresist Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093591D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harvilchuck, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The number and size of pinholes in silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates can be detected by forcing fluorescein ions into the pinholes. This is effected by application of a +200 volt potential between a metallized portion of the silicon substrate and a platinum counter electrode. Both are immersed in a sodium hydroxide saturated ethanol solution containing 1.0 g/ liter of alkali soluble fluorescein. The latter migrates to the silicon from the exposed back side and through the pinholes in the SiO(2) film. The former can be washed away with ethanol while the fluorescein that lodges in the pinholes remains and can be detected with a microscope under UV illumination. Various fluorescent dyes can be employed. The process is extended to detection of photoresist pinholes.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Pinhole Detection in SiO(2) and Photoresist Films

The number and size of pinholes in silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates can be detected by forcing fluorescein ions into the pinholes. This is effected by application of a +200 volt potential between a metallized portion of the silicon substrate and a platinum counter electrode. Both are immersed in a sodium hydroxide saturated ethanol solution containing 1.0 g/ liter of alkali soluble fluorescein. The latter migrates to the silicon from the exposed back side and through the pinholes in the SiO(2) film. The former can be washed away with ethanol while the fluorescein that lodges in the pinholes remains and can be detected with a microscope under UV illumination. Various fluorescent dyes can be employed. The process is extended to detection of photoresist pinholes. All that is required is to perform a normal buffer etch and proceed, as described, to detect the pinholes etched in the SiO(2) due to the photoresist pinholes.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]