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Graphical Computer System to Generate Artwork for Electronic Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093592D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hubacher, EM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The graphical computer system aids a draftsman in translating an electronic circuit, diagram, schematic, into a set of precise drawings, artwork, from which masks to fabricate the circuit can be made. The system uses graphical input-output hardware, a small digital computer connected to bulk disk file storage, and a computer program using a standard programming language, FORTRAN.

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Graphical Computer System to Generate Artwork for Electronic Circuits

The graphical computer system aids a draftsman in translating an electronic circuit, diagram, schematic, into a set of precise drawings, artwork, from which masks to fabricate the circuit can be made. The system uses graphical input- output hardware, a small digital computer connected to bulk disk file storage, and a computer program using a standard programming language, FORTRAN.

Operation of the system begins when an operator enters a schematic diagram. This is done at the display screen by aiming the light pen at the names of components to be connected into the circuit. The module-layout program MLP displays the components in a work area and the operator connects them into the circuit by aiming and activating, firing, the light pen on the terminals to be connected. The program displays the connections and permits the operator to place connected components anywhere on the display screen. In this fashion, complete schematic diagrams can be entered into the computer using only the light pen and the display. This technique of entry has the advantage that the operator sees the schematic stored in the computer as a schematic, not as a series of numbers or letters punched in cards, and hence makes fewer errors in entry.

Once the schematic is entered, the operator moves on to phases of the MLP allowing layout of a circuit. The operator enters the values of each resistor and the computer designs the...