Browse Prior Art Database

X Y Alignment Tables with Angular Compensation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093616D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rottmann, HR: AUTHOR

Abstract

X-Y alignment table apparatus is provided with a structure compensating for small angular deviations, up to 8 degrees, in articles placed upon the alignment tables. The compensation for angular deviation is accomplished by linear devices as distinguished from conventionally used rotational devices. The use of such linear devices avoids the necessity of translating linear sensed information concerning the deviation into rotational movement.

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X Y Alignment Tables with Angular Compensation

X-Y alignment table apparatus is provided with a structure compensating for small angular deviations, up to 8 degrees, in articles placed upon the alignment tables. The compensation for angular deviation is accomplished by linear devices as distinguished from conventionally used rotational devices. The use of such linear devices avoids the necessity of translating linear sensed information concerning the deviation into rotational movement.

As shown in drawing A, the article 10 to be aligned is placed on the X table of a standard X-Y alignment structure. The latter comprises an X table, stepping motor 11 for moving the X table, a Y table, and stepping motor 12 for moving the Y table. In this structure, the X and Y tables are mounted on a third table 13 which provides the compensation for the angular deviation.

The article 10 mounted on table A is to be oriented into the position shown by the dotted outline. However, in order for article 10 to be aligned into such a position by X-Y alignment tables, its sides must be parallel to the final position of said sides. In placement, there has been an angular deviation theta. In order to compensate for this deviation, table 13 is moved through an angle of theta, shown in drawing B. This is effected by the application of two linear forces by screw-drives 14 and 15 and opposing spring-loaded plungers 16 and 17. By varying the distances through which each screw-drive 14 and 15 ac...