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High Speed Glass Cylinder Orientation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093630D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buettner, JH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Reed switch glass cylinders or other objects having lengths much greater than their widths are oriented vertically by placing them on a matrix of holes. Each hole has a sufficient size to hold a number of the objects to be oriented but not of sufficient size to allow the glass cylinders of other objects to fall into them horizontally. Matrix vibrations cause the objects to fall into the holes, thus orienting them vertically very rapidly. This method is much faster than manual orientation or the conventional rotary vibratory orientation technique.

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High Speed Glass Cylinder Orientation

Reed switch glass cylinders or other objects having lengths much greater than their widths are oriented vertically by placing them on a matrix of holes. Each hole has a sufficient size to hold a number of the objects to be oriented but not of sufficient size to allow the glass cylinders of other objects to fall into them horizontally. Matrix vibrations cause the objects to fall into the holes, thus orienting them vertically very rapidly. This method is much faster than manual orientation or the conventional rotary vibratory orientation technique.

The matrix, desirably constructed of metal, orients reed switch glass cylinders. The walls 11 of the matrix form a plurality of enclosures 12. Each enclosure is of sufficient size to hold a number of vertically oriented glass cylinders 13, but is small enough so that the glass cylinders cannot lie in the enclosures horizontally.

Enclosures 12 are closed at the bottom by a flat plate or screen mesh 14. Outside walls 15 of the matrix extend above the walls forming enclosures 12 in order to contain the glass cylinders in the matrix during vibration. For most rapid operation, the enclosure width should be such that the part being oriented can never rest on three parallel walls at one time.

In operation, the randomly oriented glass cylinders, typically handled in a bag containing about 2,000 cylinders, are poured on the matrix. The matrix is vibrated and the cylinders become oriented in t...