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Stabilizing the Compensation Temperature of Gadolinium Iron Garnet Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093648D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Giess, EA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Films of Gd(3)Fe(5)O(12), gadolinium-iron-garnet, about one micron thick for magneto-optical device systems are previously formed from iron-gadolinium nitrate alcohol solutions which are spun out on glass substrates. The pure bulk Cd(3)Fe(5)O(12) compensation temperature is 14 degrees C. Films of this material often have compensation temperatures which are lower than normal and vary significantly with the film firing temperature.

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Stabilizing the Compensation Temperature of Gadolinium Iron Garnet Film

Films of Gd(3)Fe(5)O(12), gadolinium-iron-garnet, about one micron thick for magneto-optical device systems are previously formed from iron-gadolinium nitrate alcohol solutions which are spun out on glass substrates. The pure bulk Cd(3)Fe(5)O(12) compensation temperature is 14 degrees C. Films of this material often have compensation temperatures which are lower than normal and vary significantly with the film firing temperature.

By reducing the atomic ratio of Gd:Fe from the stoichiometric ratio Gd(3)Fe(5)O(12) through excess iron in the nitrate solution, the compensation temperature is less sensitive to the firing temperature after the film is spun out on a glass substrate.

Adding excess iron to starting solutions has two beneficial effects. Compensation temperature T(cp) is increased nearer to 14 degrees C and it is less sensitive to firing temperature. The effect is particularly noticeable after firing at low temperatures. For example, with firing at 750 degrees C for 1 hour, T(cp) is about +4 degrees C with 5 per cent excess iron instead of about -11 degrees C, the value for pure GdIG films. After firing at 1100 degrees C for 1 hour, both films have a T(cp) of about 18 degrees C, slightly above normal.

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