Browse Prior Art Database

Application and Recovery of Gallium

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093655D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davidse, PD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This process of applying and recovering gallium is employed in RF sputtering operations. The process is suitable for manual operations and also continuous automated production operations.

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Application and Recovery of Gallium

This process of applying and recovering gallium is employed in RF sputtering operations. The process is suitable for manual operations and also continuous automated production operations.

In RF sputtering of glass and other insulating films, as described in an article to be published in the Journal of Applied Physics in early 1966, gallium is employed to secure the substrate to be glazed to a holder. Gallium is particularly desirable where accurate temperature control is required. This is because of the good heat conducting capability of the gallium bond. Since gallium is expensive, its practical economic use in production necessitates that it be successively recovered and reused.

Gallium can be efficiently applied by pressing a substrate against a rotating, soft and porous material, such as soft polyurethane foam. The latter is saturated with gallium and maintained at temperatures above 30 degrees C. The melting point of gallium is approximately 30 degrees C. The apparatus for applying the gallium can either be a disk of foam material rotated about a vertical axis or a roller of foam material rotated about a horizontal axis and maintained in contact with gallium in a liquid state. This operation is most conveniently carried out in an enclosure through which filtered air is blown.

The gallium is recovered by supporting the resultant gallium backed substrates in a suitable rack and immersing it in an ultrasonically agitated hot ...