Browse Prior Art Database

Split Socket

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093675D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Uberbacher, EC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When a printed circuit card is inserted into a conventional socket, a relatively high degree of wear results on the socket contacts. This is because of the drag between the card contacts and the socket contacts. In order to avoid such wear, a separable socket is made of top half 11 and bottom half 13 which are spring-biased toward each other. Upon insertion, the side parts of card 14 engage inclined lobes 15 and 17. Thus, the two connector halves are separated and the upper and lower socket contacts 19 and 21 are spaced away from the board surfaces, as shown in the left drawing. In the right drawing, the card is in its final position. The lobes have moved into abutting relation in a card cavity 23 and thus the spring-biased connector halves are moved into contact.

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Split Socket

When a printed circuit card is inserted into a conventional socket, a relatively high degree of wear results on the socket contacts. This is because of the drag between the card contacts and the socket contacts. In order to avoid such wear, a separable socket is made of top half 11 and bottom half 13 which are spring- biased toward each other. Upon insertion, the side parts of card 14 engage inclined lobes 15 and 17. Thus, the two connector halves are separated and the upper and lower socket contacts 19 and 21 are spaced away from the board surfaces, as shown in the left drawing. In the right drawing, the card is in its final position. The lobes have moved into abutting relation in a card cavity 23 and thus the spring-biased connector halves are moved into contact. With this movement, the thin card contacts are engaged by the socket contacts as the card nears its final position where normal contact pressure is applied. With this arrangement, excellent retention of the card in the socket results.

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