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High Speed, Diode Transistor Current Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093728D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jen, TS: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a current switching circuit. It makes use of a diode's inherently fast switching to increase the circuit's speed.

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High Speed, Diode Transistor Current Switch

This is a current switching circuit. It makes use of a diode's inherently fast switching to increase the circuit's speed.

Transistor T1 and diode D2 have their respective emitter and cathode electrodes connected through resistor 4 to a source of negative potential -V, the common current switch configuration. The logical input to the circuit is applied via input conductor 5 to the base of T1. The anode of D2 is connected through resistors 6 and 8 to a source of positive potential +V. The collector potential for T1 is taken from the mid-point of resistors 6 and 8 through resistor 10.

The collector potential of T1 and anode potential of D2 are transmitted via conductors 12 and 14 to the base inputs of a succeeding current switch which includes transistors T16 and T18. The circuit's complementary outputs are taken from terminals 22 and
24.

T1 and D2 are both biased to be in continual conduction. The relative levels of conduction in T1 and D2 vary in accordance with the level of the input on conductor 5. If it is assumed that the input is at a down logical level T1 is rendered less conductive and its collector potential is caused to increase. This increase, in addition to increasing the potential on conductor 12 and as a result the conduction through T16 also is transmitted through resistor 10 to the mid- point between resistors 8 and 6. Thus, the forward bias across D2 is increased.

Thus, the resulting increase in conductio...