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Making Thick Metallic Deposits on Nonconductive Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093744D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hall, WM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One of the problems involved in the deposition of thick metallic deposits on nonconductive substrates by chemical reduction of the metal cations from baths containing hypophosphite anion is the formation of blisters. In the deposition of cobalt-phosphorus for example there is usually little or no blistering during a plating time of one and one-half to two minutes with the resulting deposition of cobalt-phosphorus mass of about 0.150 mg/cm/2/and a thickness of about 1500 Angstroms. However, if it is desired to deposit a thicker layer of metal that is free of blisters normal plating methods are inadequate. This problem is overcome by uniform agitation of the solution or substrate during the metal plating process.

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Making Thick Metallic Deposits on Nonconductive Substrate

One of the problems involved in the deposition of thick metallic deposits on nonconductive substrates by chemical reduction of the metal cations from baths containing hypophosphite anion is the formation of blisters. In the deposition of cobalt-phosphorus for example there is usually little or no blistering during a plating time of one and one-half to two minutes with the resulting deposition of cobalt-phosphorus mass of about 0.150 mg/cm/2/and a thickness of about 1500 Angstroms. However, if it is desired to deposit a thicker layer of metal that is free of blisters normal plating methods are inadequate. This problem is overcome by uniform agitation of the solution or substrate during the metal plating process. Rapidly changing the boundary layer of solution next to the plated metallic material allows plating of increased thickness. There appears to be a minimum flow rate either laminar or turbulent below which blisters occur. Above this rate, which must be uniform, blisters do not occur. Loss of adhesion is experienced only when the plated metal becomes so thick that the stresses inherent in the metallic layer overcome the adhesion of the metal to the substrate and the metal layer grossly cracks or peels due to stress rather than blister formation.

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