Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Having Variable Frequencies

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093782D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Myers, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The frequency of emission of this laser is variable. A pair of mirrors M1 and M2 surround an active medium which can be an ion laser tube L. Power supply S causes laser L to emit light extending over a range of frequencies for which oscillation is possible.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 99% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Laser Having Variable Frequencies

The frequency of emission of this laser is variable. A pair of mirrors M1 and M2 surround an active medium which can be an ion laser tube L. Power supply S causes laser L to emit light extending over a range of frequencies for which oscillation is possible.

Polarizer P sets up a preferred plane of polarization which blocks or attenuates all light within the cavity not consistent with this plane of polarization. Electro-optic crystal C changes the polarization of light passing through it. Different amounts of light are passed for different wavelengths in response to voltage V applied across crystal C. In this manner, crystal C tunes the cavity to a particular wavelength causing emission of laser light at the selected wavelength. No emission occurs at all other wavelengths which are attenuated by the combined action of polarizer P and crystal C.

Crystals which exhibit the property called color dispersion of axes, i.e., either inclined or crossed dispersion or both are suitable for operation in this cavity particularly when they exhibit a linear electro-optic effect. Such crystals introduce an attenuation which varies more sharply with the frequency of light applied to them. This is because of the different orientation of the principal optic axes for light at different frequencies. Typical crystals which exhibit this phenomenon are Na(2)CrO(4)H(2)O and hexamethylene tetramine picrate.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures o...