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Synchronized Oscillator for Frequency Division

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093783D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCullough, JW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Synchronized oscillator 10 can be used as a variable radix frequency divider. With T1 initially off and T2 on, then at the trailing edge of the synchronizing pulse preceding the first pulse shown, T1 turns on and its collector goes positive. Capacitor C1 couples this positive shift to the base of T2 and causes it to go positive turning T2 off. C1 then discharges through R3 and T1 and the base of T2 goes negative. Since the collector of T1 is more positive than that of T2 the synchronizing pulses are coupled through D1 and C1 to the base of T2. At the trailing edge of the third synchronizing pulse, the base of T2 is sufficiently negative to allow T2 to turn on. T1 again turns on with the trailing edge of the sixth synchronizing pulse.

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Synchronized Oscillator for Frequency Division

Synchronized oscillator 10 can be used as a variable radix frequency divider. With T1 initially off and T2 on, then at the trailing edge of the synchronizing pulse preceding the first pulse shown, T1 turns on and its collector goes positive. Capacitor C1 couples this positive shift to the base of T2 and causes it to go positive turning T2 off. C1 then discharges through R3 and T1 and the base of T2 goes negative. Since the collector of T1 is more positive than that of T2 the synchronizing pulses are coupled through D1 and C1 to the base of T2. At the trailing edge of the third synchronizing pulse, the base of T2 is sufficiently negative to allow T2 to turn on. T1 again turns on with the trailing edge of the sixth synchronizing pulse. For the example shown the half period is designed to be slightly longer than three synchronizing pulse periods. Symmetrical half periods allow division by even numbers. When the time constants R3C1 and R4C2 are changed by one synchronizing pulse period this effects frequency division by odd numbers.

The input can be connected in parallel to more than one oscillator 10. Each oscillator can have a particular frequency division. The outputs of the oscillators can be logically combined so that the input signal frequency is divided by the product of the individual frequency divisions. This type of arrangement results in a savings of components.

To eliminate the remote possibility that when 10...