Browse Prior Art Database

Nondestructive Readout Chain Storage Element Geometry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093790D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, JL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Nondestructive readout capability of a two-aperture chain storage element is enhanced by a configuration including a diagonal bar dividing the apertures.

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Nondestructive Readout Chain Storage Element Geometry

Nondestructive readout capability of a two-aperture chain storage element is enhanced by a configuration including a diagonal bar dividing the apertures.

The diagonal bar, because of the division of word current Iw, requires a substantially larger word current for switching than do the sides, which receive essentially 1/2 Iw. The amount of current through the diagonal bar is a function of the angle, but is considerably less than 1/2 Iw. The bar is not switched in NDR mode.

The chain storage element generally is described by J. L. Anderson, H. O. Leilich and D. H. Redfield in an article entitled "Cross Core Memory Construction" published in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 7, Dec. 1962, at page 60.

The element is set to a data value, which can be either of binary values 0 or 1, by the combination of a threshold reducing field developed by word current 1w and a bit defining field I(B). The element retains a magnetic orientation about the bit aperture depending upon the direction of bit current. In the drawing, the element is oriented counter clockwise for the 1 value and clockwise for the 0.

The diagonal bar chain element provides for a nondestructive readout of the chain while retaining the information value stored in the bar. The bar remains unswitched by nondestructive readout word pulses because of the division of current through the element.

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