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Capillary Forming Paste

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093813D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ahn, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The paste is useful in forming capillaries in multilayer ceramic structures. In step A capillary forming paste 11 is deposited as by silk screening on separate green ceramic sheets 12 13 and 14 composed of ceramic material and organic binder and dried at 25-300 degrees C. from 10 to 60 minutes. The deposits are in the form of desired circuit patterns 15 and 16 and connecting punched holes 17U and 17L.

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Capillary Forming Paste

The paste is useful in forming capillaries in multilayer ceramic structures. In step A capillary forming paste 11 is deposited as by silk screening on separate green ceramic sheets 12 13 and 14 composed of ceramic material and organic binder and dried at 25-300 degrees C. from 10 to 60 minutes. The deposits are in the form of desired circuit patterns 15 and 16 and connecting punched holes 17U and 17L.

Paste 11 is composed of, by weight, 25-50% of a subliming solid that is volatile at or below the green ceramic sheet sintering temperature but not at the laminating temperature, such as terepthalic acid. Paste 11 is also composed of, by weight, 25-45% of a vehicle or solvent for the solids, such as an alpha methyl styrene solution in butyl carbitol acetate. Also, paste 11 contains, by weight, 5- 25% of a decomposable metallic resinate, such as rhodium.

In assembly step B, sheets 12, 13 and 14 are stacked one upon another and laminated at 275 degrees F for 5-30 minutes at 500-2000 p.s.i. Upon sintering, the laminated sheets fuse into an integral composite 18 which does not disclose a discernible interface between sheets. At the same time, the subliming solid and vehicle are gently driven off and the organometallic is decomposed, leaving metal 19 to coat the walls of the capillary openings and thus permitting capillary soaking of metals in the capillaries. A molten conductor 20 such as copper can be introduced into the openings as step C, thus...