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Surfactants for Use in Dispersing Pigments throughout a Coating Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093814D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friedman, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the production of a particulate magnetic recording media it is necessary to disperse ferromagnetic material and conductive material throughout a thermoplastic composition dissolved in suitable solvents. Dispersion of such pigments is enhanced by the utilization of surfactants during the dispersion process.

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Surfactants for Use in Dispersing Pigments throughout a Coating Materials

In the production of a particulate magnetic recording media it is necessary to disperse ferromagnetic material and conductive material throughout a thermoplastic composition dissolved in suitable solvents. Dispersion of such pigments is enhanced by the utilization of surfactants during the dispersion process.

Common natural surfactants such as lecithin added to the formulation to enhance and promote dispersion of the pigments introduces extraneous undesirable side effects. When the coating material is applied to a substrate to form a magnetic recording media the surfactants tend to act as plasticizers and to come to the surface. This causes softening of the coating weakening of its abrasion resistance and wear resistance and also causes sticking problems due to tackiness. These surface characteristics cannot normally be tolerated in magnetic recording media.

Pigment dispersion without these undesirable side effects is obtained by utilizing common surfactants in amounts small enough not to produce deleterious side effects and utilizing, in addition, substantial amounts of volatile surfactants. When such a formulation is used the volatile surfactants are removed from the coating by evaporation, and can thus cause no surface problems. Suitable volatile surfactants include diethylamine and triethylamine.

Volatile surfactants can be added in amounts equal to the natural surfactants or in excess...